Homemade Pineapple Vinegar | Om Nom Ally

Homemade Fermented Pineapple Vinegar

Alison Murray DIY, Home Remedies, Recipes 18 Comments

I have apple cider vinegar every morning in water to help with appetite and proper digestion, but it’s always a treat to make this vinegar with left-over pineapple scraps. It’s a great way to use the entire fruit after you’ve eaten the delicious flesh and a fantastic means to get more probiotic-rich fermented foods into your diet.

It should be no surprise that pineapple vinegar has all of the same fantastic health benefits of eating fresh pineapple, after all it’s made from pineapple flesh (and rind). Pineapple is rich in bromelain, well known for it’s anti-inflammatory actions and protein digestion-promoting effects and when fermented as pineapple vinegar adds a wallop of probiotic superpowers too. Drink one teaspoon of pineapple vinegar in water daily (or thirty minutes before meals) for the digestive and anti-inflammatory benefits or you can also use it instead of other types of vinegar in salad dressings or other recipes (more information coming soon!).

Homemade Fermented Pineapple Vinegar

While it’s extremely easy to make, be sure to always thoroughly wash and clean the rind of your pineapple with a vegetable brush before you start cutting it up for any pineapple recipes. That rough, spiky skin can be a harbour for dirt and bacteria. Also make sure to wash and sterilise your jars and utensils before you get started with this recipe. We don’t want any unwanted bacteria to start growing in our pineapple vinegar – just the good stuff!

As you do want some good bacteria and yeast to thrive and turn your pineapple/sugar water into vinegar don’t cap your jar tightly like you would with other food stuffs. Instead affix some thin material or paper towel over the top of the jar with a rubber band. This allow the friendly bacteria on your pineapple rind and natural air-borne yeasts to breathe and work harder to make you the most flavourful vinegar you’ll ever taste. Theis light cover will also keep bugs out – my pineapple vinegar ferment tends to draw ants… ick! Stirring the jar gently everyday for 2-3 weeks will help to further aerate the mixture and encourage healthy fermentation.

Homemade Pineapple Vinegar | Om Nom Ally

After two – three weeks of fermentation you can taste you vinegar for tartness, then strain out the leftover pineapple and pour your finished product in bottles. You might even be lucky and be rewarded with your own pineapple vinegar mother (similar to a kombucha scoby) that can be used as a starter for a new batch of vinegar. This looks like a white ‘skin’ at the top, or the bottom of the jar. You can an example of pineapple vinegar mother sitting at the bottom of my fermenting jar above (top photo). Using the mother can cut back your next pineapple ferment to little over a week. For now though, let’s dive into making our first batch of homemade pineapple vinegar!

Homemade Fermented Pineapple Vinegar: Part One
 
Author:
Recipe type: Fermentation, Home Remedy
Cuisine: Dairy-free, egg-free, gluten-free, grain-free, nut-free, soy-free, wheat-free, raw, vegan.
Ingredients
  • 1 litre glass jar, sterilised
  • 3 cups warm spring or filtered water
  • ¼ cup unrefined sugar (I used coconut sugar)
  • Scraps and rind of 1 organic pineapple (see notes)
  • 1 square of paper towel, cheesecloth, muslin or light fabric (big enough to fit over mouth of jar)
  • 1 rubber band
Instructions
  1. Dissolve sugar in water in glass jar. Add pineapple scraps and rind and secure covering material over mouth of jar with rubber band.
  2. Place in a dark cupboard or pantry at and allow to ferment for 2-3 weeks, opening container to stir contents daily for aeration.
  3. After fermenting time has elapsed, strain contents through a nut milk bag or cheesecloth into sterilised bottles and seal. Vinegar is ready for consumption now, or may be fermented for another week or so or until to desired taste. Store final product in the refrigerator - at room temperature it will continue fermenting.

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Alison is a naturopathic student, store manager of the Gluten Free Shop and a food blogger extraordinaire! Passionate about creating real food recipes that are simple. delicious, and economical, Alison is also a Life & Wellness Coach and a Spiritual Healer. She lives in Melbourne, VIC, Australia and spends her free time cooking, baking and blending.
Alison MurrayHomemade Fermented Pineapple Vinegar

Comments 18

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  1. Erik Hakanen

    Hello,
    I found and started a similar recipe before running across this one. I’m a week into the process and using cheesecloth to cover the jar. When I went to stir the jar today, about 4-6 tiny bugs flew out once opened. Oddly, they did not stick around or come back like they would around a plant. I like your idea to use the paper towel. Earlier today I doubled-up the cheesecloth. How much does the secondary environment matter? My jar is in the garage so it doesn’t freak out the family, but I imagine it’s more vulnerable to bugs. After giving it some thought I wonder if the batch is an incubation area now for more bugs. Should I throw away this batch? I was blessed w/ a mother. Can I salvage either ‘her’ or the batch by boiling at some point? I don’t recall being told to wash the outside skin on the other recipe either, so this could have been my fate from day one. Ideas?

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      Alison Murray

      Personally I would probably through the batch out (but keep the mother culture of course). You can’t boil the mother as you’ll kill the bacteria and yeasts contained, though you could boil the strained vinegar if you really wanted to keep and consume it.
      Pineapples are one of those rough skinned fruits that most definitely need a scrub before you use the skin, as small flies and fruit flies oven lay their eggs on the skin of ripe fruit. I can’t say for certain that’s where the contamination started from, but I would play it safe and dispose of it in case it’s just the start of the infestation!

      1. Erik Hakanen

        Thanks for your reply, Alison! I just worry, how do I know that the infestation isn’t actually within the mother if I were to throw out the batch and save “her?” Maybe since I’m just starting out as a young freshman and not losing “years of dedication,” it would be best to re-start from scratch. I definitely appreciate the tip on scrubbing the rind… can’t believe the other recipe never mentioned it!

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          Alison Murray

          Good point about the mother, since it’s so easy to ferment the pineapple without the mother it’s probably best to toss the whole thing :( I’m not surprised about the other recipe not mentioning to wash the pineapple though, it wasn’t until I learnt more about health and nutrition that I started washing all my produce before consuming them!

    2. julie

      You need to use something with a tighter weave than cheesecloth as fruitflies can get through it. Try a coffee filter, tshirt scrap, dish towel, etc. :)

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        Alison Murray

        Thanks for the recommendation Julie, I had meant to mention that a few layers of cheesecloth would be needed for the perfect cover and I have updated the post to reflect this. I have also added your suggestions for other materials to use on top of what I had already posted. Thank you for the input and for pointing up my mistake :D Cheers!
        Sorry for the late reply to your message also, I’ve been away from blogging for a little while lately.

  2. Alison

    This sounds like such a great recipe. I’m trying to eliminate the things I’m allergic to, like olives, grapes and apples. This is going to be a great addition to my salad dressings!

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      Alison Murray

      Using it as a salad dressing sounds wonderful Alison, I would love to hear what recipe you come up with :D Please forgive me for the late reply, I’ve been AWOL from blogging lately and replying back to everyone today. Cheers!

  3. Chuck R

    Just made a batch. it is 4 weeks old and turnout just great. But alas no mother. I am very please with the end result. Can’t wait to make a salad dressing with it.

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      Alison Murray

      Don’t stress about the mother, even without it your batch should be fantastic! Would love to hear how the salad dressing goes too, and sorry for the late reply to your comment, I’ve been away from blogging for a little while.

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      Alison Murray

      Great question J! I’ve had a few months off blogging lately so Part 2 has been a little late coming. As you’ve jolted my memory about it I’ll get to work and will let you know what Part 2 is live :)

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      Alison Murray

      Hi Valeria, being a fermented product it only gets better with age! For best results I keep mine in the fridge once I’m happy with the stage of fermentation so it stops being more sour. My latest batch is 3 months old at the moment and is still amazing.

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